Emissions and Energy: A Catch 22?

Emissions and Energy: A Catch 22?

Loading document ...
Page
of
Loading page ...

Author(s)

Author(s): Jan-Erik Lane

Download Full PDF Read Complete Article

DOI: 10.18483/ijSci.1089 273 692 1-10 Volume 6 - Feb 2017

Abstract

The COP21 process targets decarbonisation in three steps during the 21rst century. First the augmentation of CO2:s is to be halted. Next the 40 per cent reduction is to be implemented somehow until 2030. Finally, there is a hope for a carbon free economy at the end of this century. But how about energy? When we speak about the anthropocentric emissions of greenhouse gases, then we are in reality referring to the production and consumption of energy. Energy in a wide sense is vital for the operations of social systems, as energy is the capacity to do work. Without energy, no economic output or GDP. The COP21 Agreement calls for an energy revolution during this century, replacing traditional renewables and fossil fuels with modern renewables that are carbon free. But how could this be achieved in the many poor countries in the world?

Keywords

COP21, global energy transformation, GHG or CO2, implementation of COP21, Superfund (Stern), traditional and modern renewables, fossil fuel dependency

References

  1. World Bank national accounts data - data.worldbank.org
  2. World Resources Institute CAIT Climate Data Explorer - cait.wri.org
  3. EU Joint Research Centre Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research - http://edgar.jrc.ec.europa.eu/overview.php
  4. UN Framework Convention on Climate Change - http://unfccc.int/ghg_data/ghg_data_unfccc/time_series_annex_i/items/3814.php
  5. International Energy Agency. Paris. Energy Information Administration. Washington, DC.
  6. BP Energy Outlook 2016.
  7. IEA – Key World Energy Statistics
  8. Heller, J. Catch 22 (1961) New York: Simon and Schuster.
  9. Mazmanian, D.A. and P. A. Sabatier (1989) Implementation and Public Policy. Lanham, MD: UPA.
  10. Pressman, J. and A. Wildavsky (1973, 1984) Implementation. Berkeley: University of Cal Press.
  11. Ramesh, J. (2015) Green Signals: Ecology, Growth and Democracy in India (2015). Oxford : Oxford University Press.
  12. Sabatier, P.A. (1988) “An advocacy coalition framework of policy change and the role of policy-oriented learning therein”, in Policy Sciences, Volume 21: 129-168.
  13. Sachs, J. (August 10th, 2015) “Sustainable Development for Humanity’s Future” (http://jeffsachs.org/2015/08/sustainable-development-for-humanitys-future/)
  14. Stern, N. (2007) The Economics of Climate Change. Oxford: OUP.
  15. Wildavsky, A. (1987) Speaking Truth to Power. Piscataway: Transaction.

Cite this Article:

  • BibTex
  • RIS
  • APA
  • Harvard
  • IEEE
  • MLA
  • Vancouver
  • Chicago

International Journal of Sciences is Open Access Journal.
This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) License.
Author(s) retain the copyrights of this article, though, publication rights are with Alkhaer Publications.

Search Articles

Issue May 2019

Volume 8, May 2019


Table of Contents


Order Print Copy

World-wide Delivery is FREE

Share this Issue with Friends:


Submit your Paper