Urogenital Schistosomiasis and Intestinal Parasitosis Coinfection among School Age Children in Adim Community, Nigeria

Urogenital Schistosomiasis and Intestinal Parasitosis Coinfection among School Age Children in Adim Community, Nigeria

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Author(s)

Author(s): Paul Columba Inyang-Etoh, Aniedi Effiong Daniel, Ofonime Mark Ogba, Uloma Opara-Osuoha

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DOI: 10.18483/ijSci.1280 153 535 10-15 Volume 6 - Jun 2017

Abstract

The prevalence of urogenital schistosomiasis, intestinal parasitosis and their co-infection was carried out among the school age children in Adim Community from August to November, 2015. Urine and stool samples were collected from each of the subjects selected by simple random sampling method and processed using standard bacteriological and parasitological techniques. Of the 200 subjects examined, 42(21%) were infected with Schistosoma haematobium, 88(44%) with intestinal parasites and 21(10.5%) were co-infected. Subjects aged 5-10 years had the highest prevalence of infection (30%) with S. haematobium, while subjects’ aged16-20 years had the highest prevalence of infection (80%) with intestinal parasites. The difference was statistically significant (p=0.001). Males recorded the highest prevalence of infection (30%) with S. haematobium, for intestinal parasites (50%) and for coinfection (15%) while females had (17.1%), (41.4%) and (8.5%) respectively and the difference was statistically significant (p=0.001). Hookworm (45.5%) had the highest frequency among the helminthes while Entamoeba histolytica (4.6%) was the only protozoan detected. This work confirmed a high prevalence of urogenital schistosomiasis, intestinal parasitosis and their co-infection among the school age children in Adim community.

Keywords

Urogenital Schistosomiasis, Intestinal Parasitosis, Co-Infections, School Age Children

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International Journal of Sciences is Open Access Journal.
This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) License.
Author(s) retain the copyrights of this article, though, publication rights are with Alkhaer Publications.

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