Elemental Assessment in Economically Important Cirrhinus Mrigala and Labeo Rohita Fish Species Captured from Indus River at Guddu Barrage, Sindh, Pakistan

Elemental Assessment in Economically Important Cirrhinus Mrigala and Labeo Rohita Fish Species Captured from Indus River at Guddu Barrage, Sindh, Pakistan

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Author(s)

Author(s): Mushtaque Ali Jakhrani, Farkhanda Zaman Dayo, Muhammad Qasim, Shahid Ali jakhrani, Ashfaque Ahmed Jakhrani

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DOI: 10.18483/ijSci.1400 139 453 116-125 Volume 6 - Aug 2017

Abstract

This study aimed to investigate the level of trace and toxic elements (Fe, Ni, Cu, Co, Mn, Zn, Cr, Cd and Pb) in Rohu (labeo rohita) and Mrigala (cirrhinus mrigala) fish species of Indus River at the region of Guddu Barrage, Sindh, Pakistan. The fish samples were collected and processed in the Laboratories of Institute of Chemistry, Shah Abdul Latif University, Khairpur, Sindh, for elemental analysis in gill, muscle and liver of both fish species using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. Results revealed that the level of trace elements was observed within the allowable limit in both Ruho and Mrigala for Fe, Cu, Cr, Ni, Zn, Co, and Mn in the range of 8.90-6.00, 2.57-1.23, 1.17-0.25, 3.15-0.48, 0.79-0.32, 0.21-0.082, and 0.26-0.11μg.g-1 respectively. It was observed that toxic element chromium was found in gill, liver and muscle of both fish varieties at low level in the range of 1.17-0.25 μg.g-1. However, lead and cadmium were not found in both fish species. It was a good indication for consumer of these fishes of the study area. The observed concentration order of trace and toxic metals was noted as Fe > Cu >Cr >Ni >Zn >Co >Mn and Fe > Cu > Ni > Zn > Cr > Mn > Co respectively, in homogenious and dried samples of labeo rohita whereas the order was found as Fe > Ni > Cu > Cr > Zn > Mn > Co and Fe > Cu > Ni > Zn > Cr > Mn > Co correspondingly, in homogeneous and dried samples of cirrhinus mrigala fish samples correspondimgly. Difference in the order of elements in homogenous samples in comparison to dried samples was probably due to different digestion methods used in the study. It was concluded that concentration of trace elements was found within the RDA guideline as given by FAO/WHO in both fishes of Indus River at Guddu Barrage, District Kashmore, Sindh, Pakistan.

Keywords

Heavy Metals, Fish moieties, Dried method, Homogenous method, Indus River

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