The Napoléon mutation 16184T is that found in the HVS1 sequence of the mtDNA extracted from an eyebrow included in the plaster of the Antommarchi death mask of Napoléon.

The Napoléon mutation 16184T is that found in the HVS1 sequence of the mtDNA extracted from an eyebrow included in the plaster of the Antommarchi death mask of Napoléon.

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Author(s)

Author(s): Gerard Lucotte, Thierry Thomasset, Alain Pougetoux

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DOI: 10.18483/ijSci.1690 92 310 104-133 Volume 7 - May 2018

Abstract

We have extracted the mtDNA (mitochondrial DNA) from one eyebrow included in the plaster of the Antommarchi death-mask of Napoléon. The corresponding HVS1 (Hypervariable Sequence number 1) contains only one mutation, named 16184T, that is that of the Napoléon family (reference 2). That proves, in accordance with some previously established plaster particularities of the eyebrow part of the mask (reference 1) showing that it originates from the St. Helena island, that the Antommarchi death-mask of Napoléon is the nearest historical mask of the real death-mask of Napoléon.

Keywords

Napoléon, Antommarchi Death-mask of Napoléon, Plaster of the Mask, Eyebrows, mtDNA, HVS1 Sequence, 16184T Mutation

References

  1. Lucotte G. (2017). Etude minéralogique et chimique du masque mortuaire Antommarchi de Napoléon 1er. Revue de l’Institut Napoléon, 214: 27-76.
  2. Lucotte G. (2010). A rare variant of the mtDNA HVS1 sequence in the hairs of Napoléon’s family. Investigative Genetics, 1: 1-5.
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  9. Azémard G. (2002). Napoléon: revelations sur son vrai masque mortuaire, les causes de sa mort, son dernier docteur. Editions des Ecrivains, Paris.
  10. Lucotte G. (2015). L’autre masque de cire, le masque Noverraz. La Revue Napoléon, 17: 55-61.

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International Journal of Sciences is Open Access Journal.
This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) License.
Author(s) retain the copyrights of this article, though, publication rights are with Alkhaer Publications.

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