Study on the Effect of Glutamine on Proliferation and Survival of Bladder Cancer T24 Cells

Study on the Effect of Glutamine on Proliferation and Survival of Bladder Cancer T24 Cells

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Author(s)

Author(s): Sun Ningchuan, Liang Ye, Lijiang Sun, Niu Haitao

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DOI: 10.18483/ijSci.2009 13 20 68-71 Volume 8 - Apr 2019

Abstract

Objective To observe the effect of glutamine (Gln) on the proliferation and survival of bladder cancer T24 cells and explore its mechanism. Methods MTT was used to detect the proliferation of T24 cells in Gln(+) and Gln(-) groups under different time gradients. The best time was selected and the Gln(+) and Gln(-) groups were analyzed at the this time. Between the Gln(+)+Don gradients groups, T24 cells were tested for cell proliferation. Survival ratio and reactive oxygen species (ROS) content of T24 bladder cancer cells in Gln(+), Gln(-) and Gln(+)+Don groups were detected by Annexin V-FITC/PI double staining and ROS kits, respectively. The Gln(-) group was used as the control group, and the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) was added to the experimental group to observe the cell proliferation level and survival ratio. Results Compared with Gln(+) group, the proliferation level of T24 cells in Gln(-) group decreased at 24, 48, and 72h, and it was most obvisously at 72h. Compared with the Gln(+) group, the cell proliferation levels of the Gln(-) group and the Gln(+)+Don group were significantly decreased, the ROS level were increased, and the survival rate were decreased significiently. Versus the Gln(-) group, the levels of ROS in the Gln(-)+NAC group decreased, and the proliferation level and survival rate increased. Conclusion Gln deficiency can inhibit the proliferation and survival of T24 cells by increasing ROS levels.

Keywords

Glutamine, Bladder Cancer, Reactive Oxygen Species, Cell Proliferation, Cell Survival

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International Journal of Sciences is Open Access Journal.
This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) License.
Author(s) retain the copyrights of this article, though, publication rights are with Alkhaer Publications.

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