Comparative Assessment of Thermo Chemical Properties of Different Consumable Automobile Oils in Respect of their Environmental Friendly Use

Comparative Assessment of Thermo Chemical Properties of Different Consumable Automobile Oils in Respect of their Environmental Friendly Use

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Author(s)

Author(s): Muhammad Qasim, Mazhar Hussain, Tariq Mahmood Ansari

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DOI: 10.18483/ijSci.1245 163 412 69-79 Volume 6 - Apr 2017

Abstract

In this study thermo chemical characteristics of different virgin and waste engine oils (VWEO) have been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to assess thermo chemical properties of different consumable automobile oils of the local market of Multan Pakistan to have insight knowledge about their adverse environmental effects. Four vehicle engines and one air compressor engine were included in this research work. Fifteen VWEO samples including motorcycle engine oils (M1M2MU), spark ignition (SI) engine oils (S1S2SU), compression ratio ignition (CI) engine oils (C1C2CU), air compressor engine oils (A1A2AU) and hydraulic engine oils(H1H2HU) have been analyzed and compared for specific gravity, kinematic viscosity, viscosity index, pour point, flash point, total base number (TBN), total acid number (TAN), copper corrosion and sulfur contents by adopting international methods. Elemental analysis has been carried out by using atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS). The results of some of the samples were found within the allowable range. However, motorcycle engine oil M2 and SI engine oil S2 were found below the minimum test limits possibly due to the adulteration. Furthermore, the samples were subjected to elemental analysis for the purpose of their adverse environmental effects. In two samples lead (Pb) concentrations were found above the maximum allowable limits while in three samples Chromium (Cr) level was more than its upper allowable limit.

Keywords

Thermo-Chemical, Characteristics, Automobile Oils, Environmental, Hazardous

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International Journal of Sciences is Open Access Journal.
This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) License.
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